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Nobody likes a 'fat-talker,' Notre Dame study shows
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Author:  Spender [ Thu May 09, 2013 5:42 pm ]
Post subject:  Nobody likes a 'fat-talker,' Notre Dame study shows

I knew I'd find it: scrolling through the forum to find just the right place for this, because it is really special and sooooo important to us, as people with eating disorders. Fat talk not only may make you less popular, but it reinforces the negative self-talk that fuels and feeds your eating disorder, growing your self-image into a giant of negativity overshadowing everything around it.

Stop with the fat talk. Start with the, "I like [insert something here] about myself or [insert something here] about my body."

Quote:
Nobody likes a 'fat-talker,' Notre Dame study shows

Women who engage in "fat talk" — the self-disparaging remarks girls and women make in relation to eating, exercise or their bodies — are less liked by their peers, a new study from the University of Notre Dame finds.

Led by Alexandra Corning, research associate professor of psychology and director of Notre Dame's Body Image and Eating Disorder Lab, the study was presented recently at the Midwestern Psychological Association annual conference.

In the study, college-age women were presented with a series of photos of either noticeably thin or noticeably overweight women engaging in either "fat talk" or positive body talk; they were then asked to rate the women on various dimensions, including how likeable they were.

The women in the photos were rated significantly less likeable when they made "fat talk" statements about their bodies, whether or not they were overweight. The women rated most likeable were the overweight women who made positive statements about their bodies.

"Though it has become a regular part of everyday conversation, 'fat talk' is far from innocuous," according to Corning.

"It is strongly associated with, and can even cause, body dissatisfaction, which is a known risk factor for the development of eating disorders."

Although fat talk has been thought of by psychologists as a way women may attempt to initiate and strengthen their social bonds, Corning's research finds that fat-talkers are liked less than women who make positive statements about their bodies.

"These findings are important because they raise awareness about how women actually are being perceived when they engage in this self-abasing kind of talk," Corning says.

"This knowledge can be used to help national efforts to reduce 'fat talking' on college campuses."

EurekAlert!

Author:  veGA [ Thu May 09, 2013 5:56 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Nobody likes a 'fat-talker,' Notre Dame study shows

This is so interesting... given my personal experiences in such situations, I've felt much more comfortable around people who are neutral or positive about their bodies than around people who constantly criticise themselves. It's sad but 'fat talk' sometimes acts as a bonding activity between girls. Like, "Oh, my thighs look huge." "Stop it, my arms are so flabby." A bit like this scene in Mean Girls, really.

I've stopped engaging in 'fat talk' over the last year or so - just reassuring someone and changing the subject. I don't regret it at all :)

Author:  stellie [ Thu May 09, 2013 10:21 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Nobody likes a 'fat-talker,' Notre Dame study shows

I too found this really interesting. I have always felt uncomfortable when people start criticising their bodies....i have definitely been guilty of this in the past but have been making a big effort to just not engage in "fat-talk". It is not only damaging to me but others also.

Author:  Persephone [ Fri May 10, 2013 5:21 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Nobody likes a 'fat-talker,' Notre Dame study shows

I wonder if it's a cultural thing? In Turkey everybody is obsessed with their weight. It is ' normal' to greet someone you haven't seen in a while with 'you've lost/gained weight'. They make personal remarks about each other, all and themselves, all the time, like telling you you need a haircut, or that they've gained a pound etc. I noticed the same when I lived in Japan. The other foreign girls would get upset but I was used to it from Turkey. Wonder if the results would be different if that study were carried out in different countries.

Author:  chickadee [ Fri May 10, 2013 5:40 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Nobody likes a 'fat-talker,' Notre Dame study shows

^what you're describing is normal in the US too.

The article seems to be pointing towards people whom are talking about themselves and not those who comment on the weight of others.

Interesting study.

Author:  delenda [ Fri May 10, 2013 9:38 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Nobody likes a 'fat-talker,' Notre Dame study shows

That's interesting. "Fat talk" has always made me uncomfortable, but I assumed it was because of my eating disorder. It's interesting to see that fat talk makes everyone uncomfortable, and that people are stoked when overweight people are stoked on their own bodies.

Author:  Persephone [ Fri May 10, 2013 9:49 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Nobody likes a 'fat-talker,' Notre Dame study shows

chickadee wrote:
^what you're describing is normal in the US too.

The article seems to be pointing towards people whom are talking about themselves and not those who comment on the weight of others.

Interesting study.


No, I mean they talk about others and also themselves. It's like talking about the weather. And it's not the same as the US version because my US friends are always shocked how upfront it is and they consider it rude. I've heard it's the same in China.

Author:  FadingHippie [ Fri May 10, 2013 9:51 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Nobody likes a 'fat-talker,' Notre Dame study shows

I think *that* particular part is the most interesting... The really it makes total sense. When thin people are comfy on their bodies I imagine a lot of people think, "of course you are... You're thin"


And this doesn't really surprise me. I have never been very body image centric but it drives me insane at work to hear the diet talk and weight loss talk in the merchandising office. I honestly think it makes them sound less intelligent due to the amount of time they spend talking about something so trivial and superficial.

Author:  FadingHippie [ Fri May 10, 2013 9:53 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Nobody likes a 'fat-talker,' Notre Dame study shows

Persephone wrote:
chickadee wrote:
^what you're describing is normal in the US too.

The article seems to be pointing towards people whom are talking about themselves and not those who comment on the weight of others.

Interesting study.


No, I mean they talk about others and also themselves. It's like talking about the weather. And it's not the same as the US version because my US friends are always shocked how upfront it is and they consider it rude. I've heard it's the same in China.




Based on some of my foreign relatives... I agree that it's not the same. I think talking about weightloss is common in the states, but if someone else talks about our (not their) weight gain we (would) consider it rude.

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