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 Post subject: Why you should register for WeBiteBack
PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 4:43 am 
admin team

Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2013 6:04 pm
Posts: 45
WeBiteBack offers as much information as we can in the Public Foyer so any non-member can get information, find other ED-recovery sites, blogs, information, and get inspiration from our promotion of Body Acceptance and self-love. However, a lot more information, support and fun things are happening when you register.

Amuse bouche: is your "daily check-in": the inner workings of the site start with a fun section, including introductions (we promise to make you welcome), Brunch Social (we have the best confessions, but also threads to talk about how you're feeling today), your daily smile (a great way to get your endorphins without exercising compulsively), and a place to rant about the world - little things that just get under your skin and you want to have a place to let it out, let it go, and move on.

Hors-D'oeuvre: is all the news that's fit to print: policies and protocols (under reconstruction), news, help desk and the original post proana threads that started this place waaaay back in 2006: an alternative to madness of death by eating disorder.

Recovery Minded: contains forums for recovery discussion, "what if" exercises ("What if we recovered?", for example), recovery tools, including a forum for DBT/CBT (under construction), as well as a host of other tools, and a forum to talk about treatment. Wondering what you want to see in a therapeutic relationship? We have opinions from all kinds of viewpoints to help you think about what will work for you.

Body and Soul: is a place to talk about other mental health issues, general health, healthy exercise, self-help (strategies for replacing self-harm as a coping mechanism), and substance use issues.

Journals. What more can we say? Journalling is a place to let your thoughts out "on paper" in a safe, supportive atmosphere where we can get to know you and get a better idea how to support you in moving forward in recovery, or in picking yourself back up after one of the many slip-ups in the recovery process.

Eating Disorders: contains a well-used forum containing research and articles to keep you up to date on the latest - only a sampling of which are posted in News about Town in the Public Foyer, and a forum to talk generally about your EDs. As noted here (click on the red text), we have kicked the DSM to the curb and are building a new and improved behaviour-based eating disorder section which focusses on what we have in common rather than giving ourselves "names" and feeding the stories.

Living with Peace you beyond recovery and offers a quiet, contemplative place to talk about spirituality and mindfulness.

Ch-Ch-ch-changes takes you all the way from leaving home right through to aging while Strut your Stuff gives you the opportunities to show us who you are when you're busy living an active life. Are you All About the Arts? What music calms your soul or has you dancing on the bed? Looking for good reads? Are you an artist or writer wanting to show us your stuff?

And finally, Odds and Ends is just a miscellany of forums. Recipes? We got 'em. Like doing polls - this is your place? Or are you more into debate - what do you think about the issues of the day?

WeBiteBack moves recovery from the personal to the fun to the world around you and how you move forward in it. We are more than a site about eating disorders: we are a site that supports you in leaving your eating disorder behind to enjoy a world full of interesting, demanding and tasty things.

Registration (click on the red text) is free, easy, and opens up a world of change, if change is what you are seeking.

_________________
Eating Disorder Recovery: One Bite at a Time!

Register for WeBiteBack here


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 Post subject: Re: Why you should register for WeBiteBack
PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:00 pm 
admin team

Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2013 6:04 pm
Posts: 45
This describes how we try to treat each other on this board:

Quote:
Advocate and veteran actress Ali MacGraw spoke so eloquently on her struggles with addiction and the power of being able to step into a community of people like yourself – what she referred to as your "tribe." She explained that within your tribe you feel at home, understood, and supported. There is unspoken acceptance and understanding that allows you the feel safe saying "this is what I am feeling right now," and to take comfort in the fact that these people truly understand. Your tribe will wrap you in encouragement, strategies for coping, and words of healing.

Kantor & Kantor


WeBiteBack is a judgment-free zone. We empathise, support, offer ideas for developing positive skills and strategies to replace maladaptive ones, challenge your eating disorder in a constructive way when it "holds the pen". We do not offer advice on weight loss, weight loss surgery, and we actively promote wellness and body acceptance - all bodies and work to eliminate "fat stigma" both here, and in other areas of our lives.

We can be your "tribe" while you work for recovery and wellness.


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 Post subject: Re: Why you should register for WeBiteBack
PostPosted: Thu Dec 12, 2013 7:55 am 
admin team

Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2013 6:04 pm
Posts: 45
Just a reminder, communities like WeBiteBack (and others, many listed in our Links forum) are around when the clinicians go home. With members and mods from all over the world, there is almost always someone awake who can encourage you, listen with empathy but without judgment, and give you some ideas for how to surf negative urges or channel your distress into positive coping mechanisms.


Quote:
TEENS WITH ANOREXIA SEEK HELP ON MONDAYS, AND OTHER LESSONS FROM BIG-DATA COUNSELING

CRISIS TEXT LINE, THE HOTLINE FOR A TEXT-DEPENDENT GENERATION, IS REACHING TROUBLED TEENS IN NEW WAYS AND USING THE DATA IT COLLECTS TO BE MORE EFFECTIVE IN TIMES OF TROUBLE. HERE ARE SOME SURPRISING FINDINGS.
BY Rebecca Greenfield
November 22, 2013

Hoping to appeal to teens, who (generally) spend their days in school, most crisis centers are open in the afternoons and evenings, say, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., an idea that made sense until Crisis Text Line started collecting data on when teens reach out for help. It turns out, these centers are doing it wrong.

After three months, 6,400 conversations, and a quarter-million messages, Crisis Text Line, an SMS-based counseling service, has started to amass its data to learn things about the way young people talk about their problems with professionals. One early, and revealing, lesson: "We found that it’s really those overnight hours and weekends that teens are reaching out the most," Jen Chiou, CTL's executive director, told Fast Company.

Despite sounding somewhat logical--late nights are when young people can be alone with their thoughts--those hours don't match up with how centers currently serve young people dealing with serious issues like anorexia, depression, sexual abuse, and suicide. The theory goes that after-school hours work best--but really, that's only true for staffers at call centers. "That's often the easiest way to staff the program, not when teens are the most acute in need," added Chiou. CTL, on the other hand, provides a 24-hour service and plans to use that information to improve staffing at facilities.

That's just one of the many interesting and useful trends CTL has learned during its pilot period of the program, which launched over the summer. The team has also seen patterns emerge about when teens text most about certain issues. And while some issues tend to come up midweek, others spike at the end of the weekend. "Most people assume eating disorders flair up during lunchtime and right after school," founder Nancy Lublin said in an email. "Nope. We've found that high-volume eating disorder trouble is Sunday, Monday, Tuesday. Think about what this information means for schools, counselors, eating-disorder organizations, families." The most common issues that teens text about are depression, self-harm, and sexual relationships.

As time progresses and data piles up, the organization hopes to use its trove of information to improve current, and somewhat outdated, counseling techniques. "Let’s say we see a particular issue on Mondays and Tuesdays; we can talk to other people in the space, other organizations working on that issue, and make sure they’re offering services especially during that time of the week," Bob Filbin, CTL's chief data scientist, explained.

Unlike phone calls--the traditional mode of communication for these situations--texting, in addition to being a better way to reach teens, enables more research and data collection. Texting is also a more intimate medium, so the counselors find teens sharing more and more quickly than with a call. In fact, the motivation for the service came from a particularly alarming text that came via Do Something, the teen volunteering organization where the idea originated. It read: "He won't stop raping me, it’s my dad, are you there." That's the type of thing a teen might not share via phone, at least not on the first call.

From a research standpoint, that's powerful. While calls end, text conversations can continue, allowing counselors to get follow-up information on a case. That means CTL and the counselors it works with can learn what leads to success or follow patterns. For example, CTL wants to track language cues to help assess when emergency intervention might be needed. Or, conversely, look at what counseling tactics helped a teen in need.

Much of that research will involve natural language processing, for which CTL has teamed up with the MIT Media Lab. The initiative has started with the basics, tagging conversations with the issues that come up. "That allows us to do data analysis at scale that hasn’t been possible," explained Chiou. "We already have over a quarter-million messages to analyze." Another idea is to do sentiment analyses. The counselors have started asking teens how they felt a text conversation went. With enough responses, researchers can see what phrasing from counselors shifted the emotions one way or another.

And that is only the beginning. Right now, CTL has three text-counseling centers--in Boston, Miami, and Seattle--and the pilot program only focused on outreach in El Paso and Chicago. The organization is hoping to expand and get even more data to disrupt counseling and better help teens.

Fast Company

_________________
Eating Disorder Recovery: One Bite at a Time!

Register for WeBiteBack here


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